Barn Plans - Safe, Secure, and Fast Online Ordering

Search for:
If you have found this website useful, please help us to continue providing this information...
Home

Barn Plans

Horse Farm Planning

Horse Safety

Barn Layout

Barn Construction

Arena Construction

Photo Galleries

Questions & Answers

Recommended
Resources


The Mercantile

The RoundPen

The StableHand

Useful Links

Feedback

Who We Are

Contact Us


StableWise


 

What are the safest fencing materials?

 

Wood is the most commonly used fencing material, but is it the safest? Well, some people think that if it is a natural product, then it must be okay. This makes some sense, for horses have existed in the wild forever surrounded by wood, rock, vegetation, etc. So itís not the material that may be unsafe, but what man has shaped it into. A sharp wooden corner is still a sharp corner. Whether you decide on wood, metal, vinyl, hot tape, etc., care must be taken upon installation to minimize potential hazards to a horse that may run into it, get caught up in it, or just plain brush up against it. The one material that, in our opinion, should never be used is barbed wire. This type of fencing was designed to contain tough skinned, slow moving cattle. It can kill a horse that gets tangled up in it. Any fencing material is potentially hazardous, but as of yet, a proven way of making barbed wire safe around horses does not exist. With that in mind, what are the pros and cons of other fencing types? Well, wood is probably overall the safest, just because it is a natural material. It has a fair amount of "give" to it when a horse rubs against it, or even runs into it. Unfortunately, it is also expensive when done on a large scale and must be properly treated with a preservative to retard rot. 

Metal, as in what they call "safety horse fencing", comes with 4 or 5 inch open squares made out of extra heavy gauge wire, resembling giant chicken wire. This is fine, if only the best grade of material is used (full wrap around construction, not welded), and it is properly installed, with a wooden 2 x 6 or similar rail to hold the top and the same at the bottom to prevent small hoofs from slipping through the gap. Vinyl is the longest lasting (although it hasnít been around quite long enough to really prove this), and it never needs painting. It is also the most expensive, making a large scale fencing operation a huge financial undertaking. This must be weighed against the amount of time you are willing to spend maintaining your fence, though. For many, the cost is justified. With any fence you choose, it can be made safer and less maintenance intensive by putting a band of "hot tape" electric fencing along the top. This keeps the horses from chewing on or otherwise playing with the fence. Use the best quality tape or rope you can find, and it will pay for itself many times over, especially since the cost of doing this will be a tiny fraction of what the actual fence costs.

Fencing...

 

Top of page

Home | Barn Plans

Horse Farm Planning | Horse Safety | Barn Layout | Barn Construction | Arena Construction

Photo Galleries | Questions & Answers | Recommended Resources | The Mercantile

The RoundPen | The StableHand | Useful Links

Feedback | Who We Are | Contact Us



Comments? Suggestions? Please tell us!

The information contained on this site is intended for general informational and educational purposes only.
Visitors should not rely solely upon any information contained on this site for their specific or particular needs.

Privacy Statement

Copyright©2000-2005 StableWise